TSC-1000 - How it Works and Troubleshooting Guide

Applies to machines built from: 
January, 2010

How it Works

The Through-Spindle Coolant (TSC-1000) uses a diaphragm pump in a self-contained cart to move pressurized coolant through the cutting tool. The coolant then returns to the coolant tank. The coolant continuously cycles through the coolant system.

  1. TSC-1000 Pump Pressurizes and pumps the coolant from the coolant tank through the TSC system.
  2. Check Valve: A one-way valve that lets coolant flow through in one direction. It does not let the coolant flow back down into the tank when the pump is powered off. The pressure sensor in the check valve tells the control that the system is working.
  3. Vacuum Generator: This creates a vacuum effect to remove excess coolant from the TSC system.
  4. Precharge Solenoid (40-Taper belt-driven): During TSC operation, the precharge solenoid applies low-pressure air to the Tool Release Piston. This helps to maintain a seal between the TRP and the top of the drawbar.

    or

    Coolant Union Solenoid (50-Taper or inline): During TSC operation, the coolant union solenoid applies low-pressure air to the coolant union. This helps to maintain a seal between the rotating and non-rotating parts.

TSC-1000 Pump Diagram

This graph shows approximate pressure vs. tool orifice diameters.

Use M88 to activate TSC, and M89 to deactivate it. You can also press AUX CLNT to activate and deactivate the TSC pump.

Symptom Possible Cause Corrective Action Section
Alarm 151 LOW THROUGH SPINDLE COOLANT There is an electrical fault with the TSC power supply. Inspect the contactors. 1
There is no incoming voltage. Check the incoming power.
The TSC pressure sensor does not work. Some coolant flow may occur if this is the case. Test and troubleshoot the coolant pressure sensor. 2

Low coolant flow, no alarm.

Low coolant flow, the pump cavitates (cavitation sounds like heavy grit in the pump head, or a suction sound) or is otherwise noisy

The coolant does not return to the coolant tank fast enough. Remove chip buildup from the coolant return path. 3
The coolant level in the coolant tank is low. Fill the coolant tank.
The coolant level drops in the auxiliary filter tank while the machine is in operation. Check for leaks and inspect the gasket. 4
The auxiliary filter is dirty. Replace the auxiliary filter.
Air is trapped in the coolant pump. Cycle the pump power.
The vacuum generator, or air bleed valve, valve on the pump does not operate correctly. Clean the vacuum generator assembly, or air bleed valve. 5
Chips clog the supply hose. Remove all chips from the supply hose, the fittings, and the pipes.
The output hose touches the machine enclosure. Move the coolant output hose. Vibration from the hose can cause noise. 6
The oil reservoir on the TSC-1000 pump body has a low oil level. Fill the oil reservoir.

Section 1

Symptom: Alarm 151 LOW THROUGH SPINDLE COOLANT

Possible Cause: There is an electrical fault with the TSC power supply. There is no incoming voltage.

Corrective Action:

Check for a tripped circuit breaker [1] in the coolant pump.

Loose wires can cause arcing. Tighten and inspect the circuit breaker [1] and the contactor [2]. Make sure the screws that hold the wires of the circuit breaker [1] and contactor [2] are secure and tight.

Check the incoming voltage to the TSC unit. The TSC receives power from a separate source, independent from the machine's power. If there is no voltage, check for the tripped breaker at the external power supply. If the breaker is tripped, check for a short to ground at the external power supply connection.

Check the pump for shorts:

Measure the (3) leads to ground in the TSC power cable. If all leads test open to ground, the pump and cable do not have a short.

If the power cable lead test indicates a short, disconnect the cable from the motor. Measure the (3) cable leads on the pump contactor [2] to ground. If any lead on the pump contactor [2] tests short, the pump is at fault. If the pump contactor [2] leads do not test for short, the cable is at fault.

If all leads test OK:

Check the TSC motor for binding that could cause an over amperage condition.

Section 2

Symptom:Alarm 151 LOW THROUGH SPINDLE COOLANT

Possible Cause: The TSC pressure sensor does not work. (Some coolant flow may occur if this is the case.)

Corrective Action:

Press PARAM/DGNOS. Go to the I/O diagnostics page.

Short the sensor connector leads together. The Low TSC Pressure bit state should change from 1 to 0. If it does not change, then the cable or the I/O PCB is damaged. Go to diy.haascnc.com to troubleshoot the I/O PCB.

The pressure switch is connected to a bracket above the spindle. Replace the pressure switch if it is defective:

If the bit changes, use an inline pressure gauge to verify the pressure is correct. If the pressure is over 40 psi, replace the switch.

Section 3

Symptoms: Low coolant flow, no alarm. Low coolant flow, the pump cavitates (cavitation sounds like heavy grit in the pump head, or a suction sound) or is otherwise noisy.

Possible Cause: The coolant does not return to the coolant tank fast enough. The coolant level in the coolant tank is low.

Chips build up in the auger trough [1], and the coolant return drain [2] on the enclosure pan. This slows the coolant from returning to the coolant tank.

Corrective Action:

Remove all chips from the the auger trough [1], and the coolant return drain [2].

Click the links, or go to diy.haascnc.com to complete these tasks:

Section 4

Symptoms: Low coolant flow, no alarm. Low coolant flow, the pump cavitates (cavitation sounds like heavy grit in the pump head, or a suction sound) or is otherwise noisy.

Possible Causes: The coolant level drops in the auxiliary filter tank while the machine is in operation. The auxiliary filter is dirty. Air is trapped in the coolant pump.

Corrective Action:

Check for leaks in the intake hose from the coolant tank.

Make sure that the tank lid gasket [1] is not damaged, and that it is clean. Make sure that the latches are tight and locked. Do not over-tighten the latches.

Go to diy.haascnc.com for information on how to replace the auxiliary filter.

Use the wash down hose or the standard coolant pump to fill the auxiliary filter tank.

Make sure the pump pick-up tube is tightly connected to the tank lid.

Cycle the power to the coolant pump to clear the empty chambers of air until the pump runs smoothly.

Section 5

Symptoms: Low coolant flow, no alarm. Low coolant flow, the pump cavities (cavitation sounds like heavy grit in the pump head, or a suction sound) or is otherwise noisy.

Possible Cause: The vacuum generator, or the air bleed valve, on the pump does not operate correctly. Chips clog the supply hose.

Corrective Action:

Drain the auxiliary filter tank. Remove the cover from the auxiliary filter cart.

Clean the auxiliary filter vacuum-generator assembly: Remove the components as shown in the illustration. Remove all of the chips that clog the supply hose in the coolant tank, the fittings, and the pipes.

Pumps without the vacuum generator have a prime line fitting [1] and an air bleed valve [2]. Clean prime line fitting [1] and the air bleed valve [2]. Make sure the prime line fitting [1] and the air bleed valve [2] are not clogged.

Section 6

Symptoms: Low coolant flow, no alarm. Low coolant flow, the pump cavitates (cavitation sounds like heavy grit in the pump head, or a suction sound) or is otherwise noisy.

Possible Cause: The output hose touches the machine enclosure. The oil reservoir on the TSC-1000 pump body has a low oil level.

Corrective Action:

Vibrations or signs of rough operation are normal at high pressures.

Move the 1000-PSI coolant output hose away from the machine enclosure.

The oil level in the reservoir rises when the pump is hot and in operation. Check the oil level in the oil reservoir [1] when the pump is cold. Fill it to the cold fill line [2] with 5-30W synthetic oil.

Be aware: Many service and repair procedures should be done only by authorized personnel. The service technicians at your Haas Factory Outlet (HFO) have the training, experience, and are certified to do these tasks safely and correctly. You should not do machine repair or service procedures unless you are qualified and knowledgeable about the processes.

Danger: Some service procedures can be dangerous or life-threatening. DO NOT attempt a procedure that you do not completely understand. Contact your Haas Factory Outlet (HFO) and schedule a service technician visit if you have any doubts about doing a procedure.

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